Navajo County

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Income Qualified Rebates Return to the Clean Heat Exchange

$3,000 rebates available to Navajo and Apache County residents who qualify


Posted: Sep 28, 2011 By: Stacey Mortenson


HOLBROOK, AZ — September 14, 2011 —The Clean Heat Exchange program has been providing rebates for newer, more efficient stoves and cleaning the air in Navajo and Apache counties for more than a year now. The program kicked off June 12, 2010 and has changed out 350 stoves since that time. That also means that approximately 17 tons of pollution have been removed from the area.

In 2010 when the program started there were a limited number of income qualified rebates available and the allotted funds were quickly depleted. Typical rebates are either $1,000 or $1,500 depending on the type of stove the homeowner chooses - wood, pellet, or gas. The program recently announced the return of income qualified rebates to be applied to stove change-outs until the program ends on December 31, 2011 or when available funds run out. Income-qualified homeowners receive up to $3,000 for a pellet, gas or EPA-certified wood stove. To qualify, the homeowner must be receiving assistance from one of the following programs:

• Food stamps;

• Medical assistance (i.e., Medicaid or state equivalent);

• Women, Infants, and Children’s Program; and/or

• Income-qualified Home Energy Assistance Program.

In order to reserve a rebate and have the stove completely changed out by December 31st residents should make a reservation no later than October 1st.

New stoves can be purchased at any participating Clean Heat Exchange retailer (see list of participating retailers at www.lungarizona.org). The old stove must be removed and recycled by the retailer. The new stove must be installed by an NFI-certified professional. Just twenty percent of the available rebate funds remain.

EPA-certified wood stove models and fireplace inserts produce almost no visible smoke, generate minimal ash and require less firewood. Pellet stoves are some of the cleanest-burning heating appliances today. Gas stoves emit very little pollution and require little maintenance. The purpose of the stove change-out program is to encourage residents to replace old wood or coal stoves with new, cleaner-burning, more energy-efficient hearth appliances. Non- EPA-certified wood stoves emit smoke that causes pollution because of incomplete combustion. Microscopic particles from this smoke are released into the air and directly affect the lungs and heart and could lead to asthma attacks, lung cancer, heart attacks and strokes.

About the American Lung Association Now in its second century, the American Lung Association is the leading organization working to save lives by improving lung health and preventing lung disease. With your generous support, the American Lung Association is “Fighting for Air” through research, education and advocacy. For more information about the American Lung Association or to support the work it does, call 1-800-LUNG-USA (1-800-586-4872) or visit www.lungusa.org.

About the Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association (HPBA) An international not-for-profit trade association first established in 1980 to represent and promote the interests of the hearth products industry in North America. In 2002, the Hearth Products Association (HPA) merged with the Barbecue Industry Association (BIA) to form HPBA. The association includes manufacturers, retailers, distributors, manufacturers representatives, service and installation firms, and other companies and individuals - all having business interests in and related to the hearth, patio, and barbecue products industries. For more information visit www.hpba.org.

Previous:
NAVAJO COUNTY ATTORNEY AND SHERIFF HONORED BY U.S. ATTORNEY’S LAW ENFORCEMENT COORDINATING COMMITTEE

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Economy and State Sweeps Dramatically Cut Road Maintenance Funding in Navajo County

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